!!> PDF / Epub ☉ Housekeeping ✩ Author Marilynne Robinson – 1sm.info

Housekeeping I was craving a book like thishad wanted to read it forever I can t express how much I appreciate this book The story itself had me in the palm of my hands The writing was so rich and breathtaking I felt like I was being taken out to an expensive fine dining experience savoring every bite No POV alternating chapters not a long winded 500 page novel This powerful novel with many themes family, loss, death, abandonment, unconventional lifestyles, small towns, with memorable character I was craving a book like thishad wanted to read it forever I can t express how much I appreciate this book The story itself had me in the palm of my hands The writing was so rich and breathtaking I felt like I was being taken out to an expensive fine dining experience savoring every bite No POV alternating chapters not a long winded 500 page novel This powerful novel with many themes family, loss, death, abandonment, unconventional lifestyles, small towns, with memorable characters and an ending I never saw coming was only 219 pages A PERFECT FLAWLESS NOVEL I might as well cut to the chase here this book was a pretty significant and unexpected disappointment for me Housekeeping falls into one of my favorite literary sub genres mostly plotless, character driven novels e.g To the Lighthouse, In Search of Lost Time I d seen the Pen Faulkner Award, the best of status among recent American books voted on by writers, critics, editors and other literary sages , and the high ratings from friends with imp I might as well cut to the chase here this book was a pretty significant and unexpected disappointment for me Housekeeping falls into one of my favorite literary sub genres mostly plotless, character driven novels e.g To the Lighthouse, In Search of Lost Time I d seen the Pen Faulkner Award, the best of status among recent American books voted on by writers, critics, editors and other literary sages , and the high ratings from friends with impeccable taste But while reading, my emotions were never really aroused, and I feel that Robinson s flirtations with profundity remain just that, occasionally failing to ring true at all My requirements for this sub genre are few but demanding I ll go ahead and split them into three groups, although all three bleed together 1 I need to feel something at some point 2 the prose should be exceptional in some way, which for me is actually very much tied into 1 3 my understanding of humanity and myself should be expanded through contact with the characters and their minds This book failed me to some degree on each of these points, which is not to say that I think this book isn t good or wouldn t fulfill all of these requirements andfor another reader Regarding point 1, I felt strangely empty and uninvolved throughout, despite reading this under ideal conditions long, unbroken stretches It s very difficult for me to analyze this lack of response, but I think it s primarily tied to the prose and the characterization I should be clear about this the writing is good, even very good Perhaps I ve become spoiled or overly influenced by Modernist stylists Woolf , but the prose is often plain, occasionally beautiful, and sometimes clunky in its strivings for transcendence In the end, Robinson s nondescript approach and this is a very relative claim didn t capture my imagination Perhaps my greatest disappointment with the book, and this was a BIG surprise, was with the characterization Robinson gathers everyone into two main groups, the conformists and the nonconformists, with whom we are meant to identify via Ruthie s narration With the possible exception of Ruthie and Lucille s grandmother, each character fits neatly into these two types Can anyone who s read the book tell me what the difference is, really, between Ruthie, Sylvie, and Helen They each fall into a very specific outsider by nature category drifters or transients with a strong connection to the past, a weak connection to the present, and a malaise that somehow seems a little too pleasant considering the ever present specter of suicide I felt as if I couldn t quite follow this specific idea of non conformity, that it didn t feel true real, and that I couldn t really access or understand their lives, their desires, their concerns We re gently directed to see Lucille as intolerant, as misled in her desire for a normal life and for friends After stepping outside the fantasy of dreamy living contained within the book, however, I find her desires entirely reasonable and I think her concerns with her living situation are probablythan reasonable Now, one aspect of reviewing that s always annoyed me is when people complain about disliking characters or being unable to relate to them as a reason for disliking a book, when often the book is crafted to elicit such responses Perhaps in the past I ve been too judgmental in this respect Or maybe the important thing is simply that the characters cause you to feel some emotion, any at all, and that you can feel these people to be real, multidimensional beings I didn t get that from Housekeeping I couldn t feel the pain that Ruthie may have been experiencing because I was never sure what she was feeling, no matter how grave the situation The fallout from bad events and neutral events feltor less the same Sylvie and Ruthie s instincts felt foreign, removed, and with Sylvie in particular, borderline insane the imaginary kids storyline was a particularly forced attempt at profundity that struck me as silly and unrelatable And my chief annoyance with Robinson is that she seemed bent on pushing me toward one limited character type and away from another when, if I m forced to live in this dichotomous world she s created, I d almost certainly choose the other path the one of Lucille, the one that would lead me out of Fingerbone to the promise of Boston rather than to greasy diners, truck stops, and train cars Robinson doesn t exactly romanticize the latter type of living, but it s still portrayed as the preferable way of leaving a trapped existence When I say that I have limited access to these characters and this world, and that it ultimately felt untrue, here s what I mean this is Ruthie in the final pages of the book I have never distinguished readily between thinking and dreaming I know my life would be much different if I could ever say, This I have learned from my senses, while that I have merely imagined Really It s character revelations and discoveries like this that pepper the book, and for each one that I could say Yes, I get this, I m with you, there were two or three like that quote above where I just couldn t grasp the experience or couldn t relate to the introspection For me, that ring of truthiness was missing It s tempting to view this story broadly and crudely We see the decay that occurs when one stays in the same place the same small, sleepy, petty town Ruthie must, at some point, become active and move on toward something different or face troubling consequences Yet a similar impetus drives Lucille, the conformist What are we to make of this Is the point that different personalities have different paths, and these shouldn t be limited or overly determined by society Why is Lucille placed in a negative light when the choice that faces both sisters whether to stick with family, the past, decay presents so many difficulties Perhaps I expected the wrong things from this book, and I would ve been better off by just letting it float by without over considering some of these themes and meanings And yet, awards and reputation aside, Housekeeping often does ask to be taken seriously within the text itself I m missing something Marilynne Robinson s first novel Housekeeping were it a piece of music, would ressemble Sibelius Violin Sonata in D Minor slow and foreboding, full of winter s solitude and loneliness The setting, Fingerbone most likely in Idaho is quite reminiscent of Finland actually There is the small town surrounded by snow covered mountains with a huge lake not far from which live Ruthie, the narrator and her sister Lucille They have been surrounded by death and loss their grandfather died during a Marilynne Robinson s first novel Housekeeping were it a piece of music, would ressemble Sibelius Violin Sonata in D Minor slow and foreboding, full of winter s solitude and loneliness The setting, Fingerbone most likely in Idaho is quite reminiscent of Finland actually There is the small town surrounded by snow covered mountains with a huge lake not far from which live Ruthie, the narrator and her sister Lucille They have been surrounded by death and loss their grandfather died during a railroad accident on the rail bridge across the lake representing a way out of the life in Fishbone death or escape , their mother committed suicide by driving herself in a borrowed car off a cliff into the lake, their father walked off never to be heard from again and neither girl had memories of him, and their grandmother dies clutching at life in her sleep The motif of housekeeping is evoked by the pristine state of the awkward house built by the not so talented hands of their deceased grandfather while they are cared for by their two aunts Lily and Nona who escape as soon as another aunt Sylvie comes to take care of the girls From this point on, the house deteriorates there is a flood which rots away the furniture and books and Sylvie is so dislocated in her own mind that she collects garbage and paper and the girls start skipping school The atmosphere in the story is relatively mournful and heavy A narrow pond would form in the orchard, water clear as air covering grass and black leaves and fallen branches, all around it black leaves and drenched grass and fallen branches, and on it an image in an eye, sky clouds, trees, our hovering faced and our cold hands p.5 Fingerbone was never an impressive town It was chastened by an outsized landscape and extravagant weather chastened again by an awareness that the whole of human history had occurred elsewhere p.62 Ruthie becomesandpulled under the addictive detachedness of Sylvie it seemed to me that there need not be relic, remnant, margin, residue, momento, bequest, memory, thought, track, or trace, if only the darkness could be perfect and permanent p.116 Neither Sylvie nor Ruthie are attached to anything of value in the house for To crave and to have are as like as a thing and its shadow p.152 but rather filled it with detritus because she considered accumulation to be the essence of housekeeping p.180 Lucille has since abandoned Sylvie and Ruthie to live a normal life in town while the other two women ruminate about sorrow Every sorrow suggests a thousand songs, and every song recalls a thousand sorrows, and so there are infinite in number and all the same p.194 sometimes I think sorrow is a predatory thing because birds scream at dawn with a marvelous terror p.198 The town becomes alarmed and yet timid about threading the labyrinths of their privacy p.182 and all that is left to do for Sylvie and Ruthie is flight across the fateful railroad tracks over the lake to a life of vagrancy.Perhaps this book is too depressing given the current political climate, but perhaps it also explains a mindset of the small towns of the red states that are so terrified of change and their vengeful god that they will cling to anything to maintain a semblance of normalcy because the alternative of rootlessness represented by Sylvie and Ruthie scares them even.A beautiful book and one that makes me with to read her Pulitzer winning Gilead I found it difficult to read, but yet I didn t want it to end Difficult because it was somber and dark and slow moving and sad Yet, this quiet story with such beautiful prose kept me wantingWanting to know what would be the fate of two young girls who never knew their father, lose their mother to suicide and are left in the hands of a series of relatives over the years living in the same house built by their grandfather The writing is so clear that you can feel the cold and dampness i I found it difficult to read, but yet I didn t want it to end Difficult because it was somber and dark and slow moving and sad Yet, this quiet story with such beautiful prose kept me wantingWanting to know what would be the fate of two young girls who never knew their father, lose their mother to suicide and are left in the hands of a series of relatives over the years living in the same house built by their grandfather The writing is so clear that you can feel the cold and dampness in this place called Fingerbone, and see the darkness outside as well as in this house Ruthie narrates telling her story and her younger sister Lucille s story, but it in many ways is the story of the family, of their grandparents, their mother and their aunts , especially Sylvie who comes to live with them when the others die or leave It s a haunting tale of abandonment, loneliness, loss, and these characters trying to forge an identity which in many ways has been shaped for them by this family history I was drawn to Robinson s beautiful writing and her amazing story telling in the Gilead trilogy and was equally taken by this, her first novel 4.5 stars because even though a short book, it felt a little slow moving, but overall I can t give it less than 5 stars Her work is a treasure that will remain with me for a long time to come I hope she will grace us withof her writing Two things you should know about my thoughts on Housekeeping 1 I thinkHousekeepingis a great book.2 FinishingHousekeepinggave me a palpable sense of reliefHousekeepingis darker andintense than the author s better knownGileadThe former is also a tougher read even the most careful reader would, I imagine, find herself returning to some passages a few times in an attempt to follow the beautiful but difficult language So while I don t regret reading a tough and rewarding n Two things you should know about my thoughts on Housekeeping 1 I thinkHousekeepingis a great book.2 FinishingHousekeepinggave me a palpable sense of reliefHousekeepingis darker andintense than the author s better knownGileadThe former is also a tougher read even the most careful reader would, I imagine, find herself returning to some passages a few times in an attempt to follow the beautiful but difficult language So while I don t regret reading a tough and rewarding novel, by any stretch, there were moments when I felt like I was reading the damn book because it was good for me but not very much fun And even though I marked and will later photocopy some passages, and I would gladly recommend Housekeeping to anyone up for a caliginous and meticulous exploration of loss, depth, and identity, I d sure as hell point out the ride wasn t going to be easy Not a resounding recommendation, eh Well, I m giving the book four stars,than I give most books, and I might read the book again someday Housekeeping seems like the type of book I d want to read again And although the psychological and metaphorical I m deathly afraid of drowning, thank you very much, and underwater metaphors lurk on just about every page explorations are intense, the book will haunt me in ways that I can appreciate for the foreseeable future Check it out You are warned This is Literature with a capital L in the form of a Doric column so high you ll get a crick in your neck trying to see to the top of it You really do feel like you are becoming a better person as you read this novel, even as you fight the drowsiness which is baked into each and every sinuous delectable palpable sensuous lapidary paragraph Huh What What was that The story, such as it is, and it really isn t, is that two little sisters are orphaned and then looked after by their grandmamma w This is Literature with a capital L in the form of a Doric column so high you ll get a crick in your neck trying to see to the top of it You really do feel like you are becoming a better person as you read this novel, even as you fight the drowsiness which is baked into each and every sinuous delectable palpable sensuous lapidary paragraph Huh What What was that The story, such as it is, and it really isn t, is that two little sisters are orphaned and then looked after by their grandmamma who ups and dies and then they are looked after by elderly great aunts they were my favourites but alas they didn t last long I think they couldn t wait to get out of this book too and then by their mother s sister Sylvie who is like this kind of elegant bag lady drifter who lets the house go to rack and ruin and cares not a fig if the girls go to school There is a lot of mooning about in this novel This is the third novel I read in recent times in which the protagonist is a teenage girl and who kind of narrates the whole thing I Capture the Castle and We Have Always Lived In the Castle were the other two Maybe this one should have been called Castlekeeping Okay, maybe not When you look at movies narrated by teenaged girls they seem to have a lotzest, and hardly any mooning about I m thinking of Badlands, Clueless, Amelie, Freeway, True Grit, Mean Girls, Easy A,etc Girls with some pep to them In Housekeeping, sisters Ruthie and Lucille mostly troop about boredly observing small examples of nature, like bees and ripples and each other s coats About three quarters the way through, Lucille gets a little hacked off with this teenage novocaine Walden experience and slings her hook The reader looks longingly after her but knows he must trudge on Here is how you can tell this is literature Lucille almost ran down the stairs We heard the slish and moil of her steps in the hallYes, the hall is flooded, but slish and moil, hey Here s another Every spirit passing through the world fingers the tangible and mars the mutable, and finally has come to look and not to buy.That s on the same page as slish and moil Okay, here s another good one She seemed to dislike the disequilibrium of counterpoising a roomful of light against a worldful of darkness Not a world full of darkness, a worldful of darkness Important difference This actually means that the aunt liked to eat her evening meal in the dark and not switch on the light Here s another one Lucille would say I fell asleep, but I did not I simply let the darkness in the sky become coextensive with the darkness in my skull and bowels and bones Everything that falls upon the eye is apparition, a sheet dropped over the world s true workings.This is some fancy hifalutin chat coming from such a callow youngster And it never stops Here she is thinking about her mother and her aunt thinking about the mother and the aunt accounts for around 88% of Ruthie s thoughts, with another 12% spent on her sister She s the only teenage girl ever who didn t once think about pop music They were both long and narrow women like me, and nerves like theirs walk my legs and gesture my hands.Eventually the profound musings became like a form of transcendental muzak Thoughts bear the same relation, in mass and weight, to the darkness they rise from, as reflections do to the water they ride upon, and in the same way they are arbitrary, or merely given.Did I think this was any good Well, you know, some people like Albert Ayler, some people like Jeff Koons, some people even profess to like the films of Eric Rohmer What is Art Rock Hudson said Art is a boy s name Maybe we could rephrase that question then Did I like it No Full of loneliness but laced with quiet wit, Housekeeping meditates on the ways grief, sorrow, and depression are transmitted across generations Set in a decrepit town near a glacial lake in the Far West, the coming of age novel follows preteen sisters Ruth and Lucille as they re raised by their aunt Sylvie, a former vagrant who compulsively hoards, in the wake of the suicide of their mother Helen, whose own father met an untimely end decades earlier in a train accident The story s told from t Full of loneliness but laced with quiet wit, Housekeeping meditates on the ways grief, sorrow, and depression are transmitted across generations Set in a decrepit town near a glacial lake in the Far West, the coming of age novel follows preteen sisters Ruth and Lucille as they re raised by their aunt Sylvie, a former vagrant who compulsively hoards, in the wake of the suicide of their mother Helen, whose own father met an untimely end decades earlier in a train accident The story s told from the unreliable, droll perspective of Ruth, who subtly captures how her growing resemblance to Sylvie and Helen off puts not just her town but her own sister In ethereal prose Robinson sketches a haunting portrait of a household dwelling in loss and offers a series of striking reflections on death and belonging A Modern Classic, Housekeeping Is The Story Of Ruth And Her Younger Sister, Lucille, Who Grow Up Haphazardly, First Under The Care Of Their Competent Grandmother, Then Of Two Comically Bumbling Great Aunts, And Finally Of Sylvie, Their Eccentric And Remote Aunt The Family House Is In The Small Far West Town Of Fingerbone Set On A Glacial Lake, The Same Lake Where Their Grandfather Died In A Spectacular Train Wreck, And Their Mother Drove Off A Cliff To Her Death It Is A Town Chastened By An Outsized Landscape And Extravagant Weather, And Chastened Again By An Awareness That The Whole Of Human History Had Occurred Elsewhere Ruth And Lucille S Struggle Toward Adulthood Beautifully Illuminates The Price Of Loss And Survival, And The Dangerous And Deep Undertow Of Transience Housekeeping ,c1980, Marilynne RobinsonHousekeeping is a novel by Marilynne Robinson, published in 1980 Ruthie narrates the story of how she and her younger sister Lucille are raised by a succession of relatives in the fictional town of Fingerbone, Idaho Eventually their aunt Sylvie who has been living as a transient comes to take care of them At first the three are a close knit group, but as Lucille grows up she comes to dislike their eccentric lifestyle and moves out When Ruthie s well Housekeeping ,c1980, Marilynne RobinsonHousekeeping is a novel by Marilynne Robinson, published in 1980 Ruthie narrates the story of how she and her younger sister Lucille are raised by a succession of relatives in the fictional town of Fingerbone, Idaho Eventually their aunt Sylvie who has been living as a transient comes to take care of them At first the three are a close knit group, but as Lucille grows up she comes to dislike their eccentric lifestyle and moves out When Ruthie s well being is questioned by the courts, Sylvie returns to life on the road and takes Ruthie with her.The novel treats the subject of housekeeping, not only in the domestic sense of cleaning, but in the larger sense of keeping a spiritual home for one s self and family in the face of loss, for the girls experience a series of abandonment as they come of age.The events take place in an uncertain time, in that no dates are mentioned however, Ruthie refers to her grandfather living in a sod dugout in the Midwest, before his journey to Fingerbone, while she herself traverses adolescence sometime in the latter half of the 20th century, as Ruthie reads the novel Not as a Stranger, a bestseller from 1954 2015 2016 1393 272 9786006605395 2008 2009 2010 I m going to throw the gauntlet down and say that I thought this book was terribly overrated considering how many of my friends whose taste I ve come to respect recommended it to me All the critics from 1980 seemed amazed that this was a debut Seemed like a first novel to me.The thing that people praise most about the book was the beauty of her language I ll admit that there were some wonderful passages, and some great imagery, but there was just as much writerly prose, overwritten prose, I m going to throw the gauntlet down and say that I thought this book was terribly overrated considering how many of my friends whose taste I ve come to respect recommended it to me All the critics from 1980 seemed amazed that this was a debut Seemed like a first novel to me.The thing that people praise most about the book was the beauty of her language I ll admit that there were some wonderful passages, and some great imagery, but there was just as much writerly prose, overwritten prose, pyrite prose I felt like I was possessed by the spirit George Orwell as again and again I read poor word choices achromatic for colorless simulacra for semblance These words are not poetic substitutes but verge on jargon Blandishment Come on That s about as poetic as esophagus I also thought the philosophical meanderings of Ruthie bordered on pretentiousness So memory pulls us forward, so prophecy is only brilliant memory there will be a garden where all of us as one child will sleep in our mother Eve, hooped in her ribs and staved by her spine Whenever it appeared, this vague, didactic prose seemed to stifle what little story there was And let s not forget that these ideas could never have come from the mind of Ruthie, teen aged or aged One who spends her days trying desperately to be ignored and can barely speak does not later become a meditator on memory and the Garden of Eden I probably would have beenforgiving of the novel in these aspects if I thought there was a strong story There is not Rather, Robinson decided that a gauzy, limp tale of loss would preclude the need for any kind sustained dramatic tension We are treated to uninspiring characters with no real redeeming qualities The only dynamo in the story is Lucille and because of her conforming attitude, we are distanced from identifying with her Instead, we get to hang out with Ruthie, the world s most inactive protagonist.Now, I will qualify everything I will say that I did enjoy chapters 4 8 I actually enjoyed them a lot The conflict between the two sisters was wonderful But a good middle does not make a good book The first two chapters were all but unnecessary drawn out exposition that could easily have been woven into the rest of the book and the ending just fell flat What was Robinson trying to say That grief makes you drift That the power of memory can drag you towards oblivion I think my frustration stems partly from dashed hopes that the ending would unite and triumph Instead, I was left with a handful of images, nothing


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *