[ Ebook ] ➠ Rites of Passage (To the Ends of the Earth, #1) Author William Golding – 1sm.info

Rites of Passage (To the Ends of the Earth, #1) Ki i ba kalar n n yapt klar yla de il, kendi yapt klar yla kirlenir. William Golding s Rites of Passage is one of those books you can t say much about, since it ruins the tale On surface, it is about Edward Talbot s voyage to Australia in 1812 Talbot is a pompous young man, and aristocrat, who happens to keep a detailed journal As the pages go by, you see glimmerings of maturity, and a sure eye for recording d In The Cabin Of An Ancient, Stinking Warship Bound For Australia, A Man Writes A Journal To Entertain His Godfather Back In England With Wit And Disdain He Records Mounting Tensions On Board, As An Obsequious Clergyman Attracts The Animosity Of The Tyrannical Captain And Surly Crew. I kept changing my mind about this novel as I was reading it I liked it initially then it began losing me, to the extent that I wasn t sure I was going to finish it then it pulled me up short with a devastating narrative coup, and I was utterly gripped for a while Then there was the disappointment of the explanatory d nouement passage, which all felt a little clunky but Golding still managed to pull off a last surprise, in the form of a memorable final line The unevenness of the book begins I kept changing my mind about this novel as I was reading it I liked it initially then it began losing me, to the extent that I wasn t sure I was going to finish it then it pulled me up short with a devastating narrative coup, and I was utterly gripped for a while Then there was the disappointment of the explanatory d nouement passage, which all felt a little c Jonah The original coverSpurred by reading Lord of the Flies 1954 as a teenager, I bought Golding s next two novels on impulse, found them much heavier going, so abandoned the author until I read the first book again a few years ago What a pleasant surprise, then, to find his Rites of Passage 1980 onceeasy to read, indeed almost comic in tone Although later extended into a trilogy, To the I read Rites of Passage as the final book from the 1980 Booker shortlist as part of The Mookse and Gripes revisit of that year.Saving the best it was the winner till last Not a bit of it.The author of the enduring classic Lord of the Flies is possibly allowed an indulgence or two but to my mind Golding used up all of his accumulated literary goodwill with this one.How on earth did this win the Booker Prize One can only imagine the politics and the bitching with Anthony Powell was well p I read Rites of Passage as the final book from the 1980 Booker shortlist as part of The Mookse and Gripes revisit of that year.Saving the best it was the winner till last Not a bit of it.The author of the enduring classic Lord of the Flies is possibly allowed an indulgence or two but to my mind Golding used up all of his accumulated lit Ugh This will be my shortest review yet, because saying too much just ruins it This book was absolutely brilliant, and utterly awful, and I really hated it Which was, I m assuming, Golding s purpose And the plot movements that made it brilliant and awful work best when they unfold naturally, so this is where I ll stop.Other than to say that Golding s narration is fantastic he is excellent at writing the journal of a pompous man child the book is about a young, wealthy man on his way to a b Ugh This will be my shortest review yet, because saying too much just ruins it This book was absolutely brilliant, and utterly awful, and I really hated it Which was, I m assuming, Golding s purpose And the plot movements that made it brilliant and awful work best when they unfold naturally, so this is where I ll stop.Other than to say that Golding s narration is fantastic he is excellent at writing the journal of a pompous man William Golding s Rites of Passage makes for a strange, haunting read A ship bound for the New World, sometime in the 19th century Witty observations, as the narrator weaves his journal A self conscious narrator he wants to impress his reader But then something happens A violation so horrible that the narrator can scarcely put it into words Shame, is perhaps the word to sum up this crime of violating the innocent It s about culpability too we are none of us innocent, it s a question William Golding s Rites of Passage makes for a strange, haunting read A ship bound for the New World, sometime in the 19th century Witty observations, as the narrator weaves his journal A self conscious narrator he wants to impress his reader But then something happens A violation so horrible that the narrator can scarcely put it into words Shame, is perhaps the word to sum up this crime of violating the innocent It s about culpability too we are none of us innocent, it s a question of how guilty As with William Golding s Lord of the Flies the action takes place in isolation far away from the bigger picture of society The ship is a microcosm, a world within a world The narrator and his fellow travellers try to keep to the rules that they know The sensible rules, the ages old English rules, the rules that work but out on the creaking ship, on the vast ocean, something primal, something feral stirs Yes, it is possible to die of shame We are at the beginning of the 19th century The Napoleonic w These here are the theatrics of people aboard a ship on way to the land Down Under At page 100, after a bunch of introductions are made, the narrator s own mindset is finally set adrift like the ship herself The plot opens, and then kinda, well, nothing unexpected happens i.e absolute zero greatness This was the dude Original review 13 Oct 2015 A tragicomic tale that takes place entirely on a sea voyage in the early 19th century, this is an entertaining book,about the class system than about the sea This was a Booker winner, which raised my expectations, and I m not entirely sure it met them, and it didn t leave me feeling I should read the rest of the trilogyPostscript added 1 Feb


About the Author: William Golding

Sir William Gerald Golding was a British novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his 1954 novel Lord of the Flies Golding spent two years in Oxford focusing on sciences however, he changed his educational emphasis to English literature, especially Anglo Saxon.During World War II, he was part of the Royal Navy which he left five years later His bellic experience strongly influenced his fut Sir William Gerald Golding was a British novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his 1954 novel Lord of the Flies Golding spent two years in Oxford focusing on sciences however, he changed his educational emphasis to English literature, especially Anglo Saxon.During World War II, he was part of the Royal Navy which he left five years later His bellic experience strongly influenced his future novels.Later, he became a teacher and focused on writing.Some of his influences are classical Greek literature, such as Euripides, and The Battle of Maldon, an Anglo Saxon oeuvre whose author is unknown.The attention given to Lord of the Flies, Golding s first novel, by college students in the 1950s and 1960s drove literary critics attention to it.He was awarded the Booker Prize for literature in 1980 for his novel Rites of Passage, the first book of the trilogy To the Ends of the Earth He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983 and was knighted in 1988.In 2008, The Times ranked Golding third on their list of The 50 greatest British writers since 1945


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *